Work from Home is catching On!

Editor's Comments: While COVID forced companies to rethink where and how employees work - remote work is here to stay. It is interesting to see that it is gaining momentum with non-tech companies. I liked when Adam Ozinek from Upwork had to say as quoted in the article below. Adam Ozimek, chief economist of Upwork, said in a press release. "These findings reveal a significant opportunity for non-tech businesses to tap into new, highly skilled remote talent, unlocking the true potential of their businesses."


Article by: Hope Reese in CXO



A report from Upwork shows that nearly 40% of such roles will be able to be done remotely, as a result of the global pandemic.

As COVID-19 rolls on, continuing to keep many employees working from home or engaged in hybrid work environments, it's still unclear what this kind of shift will do to the larger economy. A new report from the global marketplace Upwork, "Not Just Tech: Remote Freelancing Across Industries," explores the increase in remote, freelance and hybrid work models in non-tech industries, and what the adoption of these models will do to the overall U.S. economy. More for CXOs As developers consider quitting, here comes the next big skills crisis

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"Not Just Tech" shows how remote freelancers may have major opportunities in this new climate -- 25.7 million jobs like this, or 37% of roles, are available in industries, such as accommodation, food services, agriculture, construction, mining, utilities, transportation and warehousing. Even in jobs that have been considered hands-on, such as construction, 10% of workers, or 1.2 million jobs, are in professional services -- in other words, able to be remote. Furthermore, these kinds of employers are increasingly communicating with remote workers: A whopping 80% of the biggest non-tech companies Upwork works with have increased spending in web, mobile, software development, sales and marketing and customer service.

Largely as a result of the shift to remote work in 2020, 22.9% of workers in these kinds of non-tech jobs became remote by January 2021. And freelance budgets swelled also: Total spending on these positions grew by over 44% for Upwork's major non-tech clients. And these clients have grown, surpassing 25% of Upwork's biggest clients.


Bringing remote workers onto the team has meant an increase in overall investment in business. According to the report, total spending ballooned by 44.2% in 2020 for Upwork's 100 largest non-tech clients. "Measured by spend, we find that businesses are hiring freelancers in web, mobile, and software development (35%), sales and marketing (12.1%) and customer service (11.7%)," the press release states. Additionally, spending in 2020 increased for 80% of Upwork's 100 largest non-tech clients.


COVID-19 isn't fully responsible for the shift to remote work; traditional industries had begun the transition prior to the pandemic, moving sales teams, web developers, customer service agents, and other employees online. Still, the global pandemic was undoubtedly a major factor in the shift.


"Typically, traditional industries outside of technology aren't considered to be remote-friendly, but our research confirms that professional services jobs exist in every industry," Adam Ozimek, chief economist of Upwork, said in a press release. "These findings reveal a significant opportunity for non-tech businesses to tap into new, highly skilled remote talent, unlocking the true potential of their businesses."

This article was updated on June 1, 2021.


More than 25 million non-tech jobs expected to become work from home - TechRepublic

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